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Therefore, when you're following a ketogenic diet, your body is burning fat for energy rather than carbohydrates, so in the process most people lose weight and excess body fat rapidly, even when consuming lots of fat and adequate calories through their diet. Another major benefit of the keto diet is that there's no need to count calories, feel hungry or attempt to burn loads of calories through hours of intense exercise.

At the core of the classic ketogenic diet is severely restricting intake of all or most foods with sugar and starch (carbohydrates). These foods are broken down into sugar (insulin and glucose) in our blood once we eat them, and if these levels become too high, extra calories are much more easily stored as body fat and results in unwanted weight gain. However, when glucose levels are cut off due to low-carb dieting, the body starts to burn fat instead and produces ketones that can be measured in the blood (using urine strips, for example).
Is it recommended to calculate our macros using the method suggested in the article to calculate yourself or by using the linked calculator? I get two different sets of numbers and am not sure which might be the better version. The main difference is amount of caloris and amount of protein to consume. The calculator gives me about 300 less calories, about the same amount of fat and carbs, but about 40 less protein than when I calculate myself.
The ketogenic diet ” a high-fat and very low-carb eating plan ” can be tough to start. After all, it's likely a radical departure from the way you're eating now (a typical standard American diet is high in carbohydrates and processed foods). But many people are trying the keto diet, which puts your body in a state of ketosis. That's what happens when your body's carb-burning switch flips to a fat-burning one, a change that can cause weight loss and has even been credited with controlling diabetes. (1)

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