Many books could be written on this very subject, and undoubtedly they have been. There are many answers, and they all depend on context. Lots of variables impact how well, and how consistently we lose weight. How much sleep do we get each night, and how restful is that sleep? What micronutrients are we not getting enough of? How much water are we drinking? How much are we exercising?
There are numerous benefits that come with being on keto: from weight loss and increased energy levels to therapeutic medical applications. Most anyone can safely benefit from eating a low-carb, high-fat diet. Below, you'll find a short list of the benefits you can receive from a ketogenic diet. For a more comprehensive list, you can also read our in-depth article here >
I'm honestly a little skeptical about it the idea of keto permanently. My brief glance at the literature seems to imply that it can have side effects of kidney stones, skeletal fractures, and slow the growth rate of children, but that was a study on kids with epilepsy (which it treated very effectively), so who knows how that applies to adults. And the other studies I found dealt with overweight and obese subjects, so it may be hard to find something on the long term effects on otherwise healthy adults.

It's always good to go into the grocery store with a game plan so you don't buy things you'll regret later. I also like to keep things as simple as possible. Going through Pinterest, every recipe seems to have a bazillion ingredients, take hours & a culinary degree to make, or require random ingredients that are annoying to find and super expensive.


Basically, the role of exogenous ketones is to boost the amount of ketones in your body. These products do work wonders if, after a long time on a keto diet, you don't feel energized or generally don't feel like you are at your best. Ultimately deciding to take exogenous ketones or not comes down to how you feel on your keto diet and trying to find a product with the highest possible quality.


The ketogenic, or "keto," diet ” which first became popular in the 1920s as a treatment for epilepsy and diabetes” limits carbohydrates to no more than 50 grams a day, which is the rough equivalent of a plain bagel or a cup of white rice. By comparison, dietary guidelines from the US Department of Agriculture recommend from 225 to 325 grams of carbs a day.
I will admit to appeal to authority here. This was said by the professor of the course I mentioned in my previous post, but it was also confirmed by many of my classmates, whom, at this point(for reasons, which are too tedious and long winded to extrapolate on atm), I consider smart enough to know their business, that I choose to believe them. All of them. If nothing else, the professor himself is,well¦ authority on his field.

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Medical Disclaimer: The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. Always consult your physician before beginning any diet or exercise program.

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