A ketogenic diet helps control blood sugar levels. It is excellent for managing type 2 diabetes, sometimes even leading to complete reversal of the disease. This has been proven in studies. It makes perfect sense since keto lowers blood-sugar levels, reduces the need of medications and reduces the potentially negative impact of high insulin levels.
It comes down to simple mathematics. In order to stay in ketosis, you need to eat a very very low number of carbs. And if you eat too much protein, this can actually knock you out of ketosis as well. Therefore, if you're eating almost no carbs, and you are eating moderate amounts of protein, the ONLY remaining macronutrient you can consume to fill you up each day would be fat. Add in that consuming fat allows you to stay in ketosis, and you are consuming a high fat, medium protein, low carb diet.

As far as fruits are concerned, most berries are low in carbs and can be consumed from time to time, and in limited amounts. These include raspberries, strawberries, and blackberries. Blueberries are a bit higher in carbs and should be eaten sparingly. Most other fruits, however, have too many carbs in just one serving, so it is best to avoid them.
Another great keto flu cure is bone broth! This is also a great healer when you are actually sick with a cold or flu or just want something comforting. Instead of its high carb alternative chicken noodle soup or even worse, store bought chicken broth (which is typically loaded with MSG and other preservative junk), bone broth is a delicious way to alleviate your flu symptoms. Bone broth is a great way to hydrate & it is also packed with electrolytes, good for you sodium and potassium.
The end result is staying fueled off of circulating high ketones (which are also sometimes called ketone bodies) ” which is what's responsible for altering your metabolism in a way that some people like to say turns you into a œfat-burning machine. Both in terms of how it feels physically and mentally, along with the impact it has on the body, being in ketosis is a very different than a œglycolytic state, where blood glucose (sugar) serves as the body's energy source.
Unfortunately, there's no long-term data on ketogenic diets versus other diets. In a 2015 Italian study, those on a ketosis diet lost 26 pounds in three months. About half of the participants stayed on the diet for a year but lost little additional weight in the next nine months. People in a 2014 Spanish study who followed a very-low-calorie ketogenic diet lost an average of 44 pounds in a year”but a third of them dropped out, possibly because it was too hard to maintain.
It also interferes with some of the social aspects of food, considering how limiting it is. No cake on your birthday. No pie on Thanksgiving. No chocolate truffles on Valentine's Day. Boo to that! If you consider yourself someone who loves to eat and takes great joy in the social experience of a good meal, then the restriction of this diet may be emotionally unhealthy.

On the other hand, the types of foods you'll avoid eating on the keto, low-carb diet are likely the same ones you are, or previously were, accustomed to getting lots of your daily calories from before starting this way of eating. This includes items like fruit, processed foods or drinks high in sugar, those made with any grains or white/wheat flour, conventional dairy products, desserts, and many other high-carb foods (especially those that are sources of œempty calories).
Alcohol also tends to interrupt ketosis, since your liver will burn it preferentially before anything else. Your body treats alcohol like a toxin and like a fuel source, so your body will use it before it uses foods or the calories stored in your fat cells. While it won't necessarily œknock you out of ketosis, it does pause it until the alcohol is cleared from your system.
Instead of thinking about the total carbs you're eating, assess what those carbs provide to you. Do the majority of your carbs come from fruit and vegetables, with a payload of fiber and disease-fighting antioxidants? Fantastic. Or are you consuming them in the form of added sugars (cookies, candy, soda) or refined flour? If you are, you know what to do.
Nursing Moms should lower carb intake slowly. Try 50 carbs a day and see if he/she still seems satisfied at nap/night time.. After a week of this, and if you're not in ketosis, then go to 45, then if you're not in ketosis and milk supply isn't affected go down again. We shouldn't go below 30 carbs a day though. However, the milk fat in our milk will increase and that should help little one! My son has done fine with me at 30 carbs a day, but I've always had an oversupply of milk, so it never bother my supply. Don't try and pump to see if your supply changes because that's inaccurate. Trust me your little one will let you know.
Just started the 100 pushup challenge with another group and that's likely going to help a bit as well. I'd been avoiding most of the exercise due to some feet issues, but the small success w/ the pushups has encouraged me to consider re-upping my weight training at the local rec center and get that going. As long as I don't hit the feet too hard, that can work. ðŸ'‚
There are so many vegetables that you can use, and so many ways to prepare them, that an entire book could be written on the topic. Most vegetables that grow above the ground are high in fiber, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. They can be added to meat dishes, cooked on their own, or eaten as a salad. Vegetables are inexpensive, easy to prepare, and can be part of every meal. Most of them are quite low in carbohydrates, so it's hard to overindulge in this food group.

Another great keto flu cure is bone broth! This is also a great healer when you are actually sick with a cold or flu or just want something comforting. Instead of its high carb alternative chicken noodle soup or even worse, store bought chicken broth (which is typically loaded with MSG and other preservative junk), bone broth is a delicious way to alleviate your flu symptoms. Bone broth is a great way to hydrate & it is also packed with electrolytes, good for you sodium and potassium.


It's not for me, but it interesting to learn these things, and of course there seem to be good reasons for doing it for some people. I'm happy with the œeat less, exercise more diet for now, but I might try out intermittent fasting since I've seen a few things suggesting it might help with allergies? I doubt that's well supported, but I've liked what you've had to say about it, so since it's not a thing I have to spend money on to try out, might as well, right?

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