There are several medical studies ” such as two conducted by the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center for the University of Iowa, and the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, for example ” that show the ketogenic diet is an effective treatment for cancer and other serious health problems. (12)
Con: Results can vary depending on how much fluid you drink. By drinking more water, you dilute the concentration of ketones in the urine and thus a lower level of ketones will be detected on the strips. The strips don't show a precise ketone level. Finally, and most importantly, as you become increasingly keto-adapted and your body reabsorbs ketones from the urine, urine strips may become unreliable, even if you're in ketosis.
I'm honestly a little skeptical about it the idea of keto permanently. My brief glance at the literature seems to imply that it can have side effects of kidney stones, skeletal fractures, and slow the growth rate of children, but that was a study on kids with epilepsy (which it treated very effectively), so who knows how that applies to adults. And the other studies I found dealt with overweight and obese subjects, so it may be hard to find something on the long term effects on otherwise healthy adults.
Depending on how you choose your fats, the keto diet can contain an abundance of saturated fat, which raises levels of dangerous LDL cholesterol and causes atherosclerosis, the buildup of fats and cholesterol in the arteries. If you decide to go keto, have a doctor monitor your cholesterol levels monthly to ensure you remain within a healthy range.

The biggest draw for me is how many of those who've tried it say they don't get hungry. The possibility of that blows my mind, as someone who's used to any sort of calorie restriction meaning hours of feeling hungry every day. It's tantalizing enough that I at least want to try. And what have I got to lose, right? I'm already morbidly obese; it's hard to imagine screwing this up so bad it makes that worse.


Many people also experience cramping, notably in the feet and legs. Because of this, you'll want to consume extra electrolytes any time you are on a ketogenic plan. People who suffer with these symptoms refer to them as the Keto-Flu, and while it isn't like the real flu, the symptoms can knock you down until you get your electrolytes back in balance.

Other forms of ketogenic diets include cyclic ketogenic diets, also known as carb cycling, and targeted ketogenic diets, which allow for adjustments to carbohydrate intake around exercise. These modifications are typically implemented by athletes looking to use the ketogenic diet to enhance performance and endurance and not by individuals specifically focused on weight loss.

Alcohol also tends to interrupt ketosis, since your liver will burn it preferentially before anything else. Your body treats alcohol like a toxin and like a fuel source, so your body will use it before it uses foods or the calories stored in your fat cells. While it won't necessarily œknock you out of ketosis, it does pause it until the alcohol is cleared from your system.
There are variations of the ketogenic diet that are implemented for a variety of reasons. One of the top reasons these variations are used are for athletes who are not getting the necessary energy required for their intense workouts. There are also those who enjoy the benefits of ketosis, but they just do not feel the same without a carb refeed day every now and then.
It can be very difficult to obtain some of the very high levels of blood ketones on this table - especially as you become "fat adapted" or "keto adapted" or whatever you want to call it. Once your body is efficient at using ketones, it makes only what it needs. Beginners may see very high levels of ketones, and then they see them drop off. This isn't because you are making a mistake and are out of ketosis - your body is no longer overproducing them.
Symptoms of the keto flu include headache, fatigue, dizziness, sleep problems, heart palpitations, cramps, and diarrhea. These side effects usually lessen and eventually resolve in about two weeks. (2) But to lessen the effects of any discomfort, simply consider slowly transitioning onto a ketogenic diet rather than rushing to change your eating habits. By slowly lowering your carbohydrate intake, while gradually increasing your intake of dietary fat over time, you can transition with less of a negative impact and potentially prevent the keto flu.
Because the main tenet of the keto diet is counting and cutting carbs ” a commonly used way to control blood sugar ” this eating approach has become increasingly popular among people with type 2 diabetes who are looking to lower their A1C, which is the two- to three-month average measurement of blood sugar levels. Indeed, research suggests this diet may lead to fast weight loss and potentially lower blood sugar for people with the disease. (13)
To see whether I was a good fit for the keto diet, Wali requested I have some lab work done, including a cholesterol panel and a fasting-insulin-level test. My results came back normal, meaning there was no medical necessity for me to go on the diet. If I were pre-diabetic or insulin-resistant, Wali would likely have made the keto diet part of my treatment.
Fats are great if you want to add flavor and texture to your meals, and will help you feel full. Some people believe swear by coconut oil, and whether or not the claimed health benefits are actually present, it's one of the fats that you might want to add to your diet. Butter is an excellent choice, as is ghee (Indian clarified butter). Duck fat is highly prized. Avocado oil is a great choice when making dressings or sauces, as it's liquid at room temperature and has a mild flavor. The fats and oils listed here are primarily saturated, and they are the least likely to go rancid and produce free radicals and inflammation in the body (5, 6).

The ketogenic diet is super high in fat (about 80 percent of your daily calories), super low in carbohydrates (less than 5 percent of your calories), and moderate in protein (typically 15 to 20 percent of your calories). This is a pretty drastic departure from the generally recommended macronutrient distribution of 20 to 35 percent protein, 45 to 65 percent carbohydrates, and 10 to 35 percent fat.
Ketogenesis has existed as long as humans have. If you eat a very low amount of carbohydrates, you starve your brain of glucose, its main fuel source. Your body still needs fuel to function, so it taps into your reserve of ketones, which are compounds the liver creates from fat when blood insulin is low. This process is known as ketosis: It's like when a hybrid car runs out of gas and reverts to pure electricity.

5) By now you should know both where you are and where you want to be. Those are the first steps. Now it's time to start planning your meals. You can use these food lists to help you figure out what kinds of foods you should be eating. Remember this is not a diet plan that has an end date. This is a lifestyle change that you will pass on to your children.
At 4 weeks you should be feeling pretty darn good. If you are feeling better, but not awesome, give it a little more time. If you have not felt better throughout this time and have stuck strictly to your low carbs and high fat, your body may not align with the keto diet. If you only feel bad because you're craving bad food, this may be a mental "block" that you need to deal with. Coaching can help.
A œmoderate keto diet is an option that can still encourage substantial weight loss and other improvements in symptoms. A moderate keto diet includes more foods with carbs and, therefore, more fiber too. Carbs are usually increased to about 30“50 net grams per day, which means foods like more high-fiber veggies, some fruit or some starchy veggies can also be included.

Sharon M. Nickols-Richardson, PhD, RD, , Mary Dean Coleman, PhD, RD, Joanne J. Volpe, Kathy W. Hosig, PhD, MPH, RD, œPerceived Hunger Is Lower and Weight Loss Is Greater in Overweight Premenopausal Women Consuming a Low-Carbohydrate/High-Protein vs High-Carbohydrate/Low-Fat Diet, The Journal of Pediatrics: Vol 105, Issue 9: 1433“1437; September 2005. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000282230501151X.
You should know that the side effects of a ketogenic diet are still being studied. In addition, there have not been significant studies for long term dieters. There are plenty of people that have used the diet long term (10+ years) and very happy with it. It is up to the unique individual, so regular checkups with your doctor are recommended to check that "everything looks good".

Quick update “ been doing a keto-type diet for a couple of months now. My BP is down to the lowest it's been in something like 10 years, though still on 1/2 dose for my meds. I've lost about 30 pounds in the last 4 months (give or take a bit as I'm not sure exactly where I started). I'll admit I still use Truvia and will have a Coke Zero every now and then, but eliminating the wheat and corn breads and sugars to reduce my carb intake to < 50g/day on average has made a huge difference. (I'm sure some still sneaks in with some of the food I eat out, but for the most part it's pretty good.)
You're transitioning. Your body is equipped to process a high intake of carbs and a lower intake of fat. Your body needs to create enzymes to be able to do this. In the transitional period, the brain may run low on energy which can lead to grogginess, nausea, and headaches. If you're having a large problem with this, you can choose to reduce carb intake gradually.
The ketogenic diet ” a high-fat and very low-carb eating plan ” can be tough to start. After all, it's likely a radical departure from the way you're eating now (a typical standard American diet is high in carbohydrates and processed foods). But many people are trying the keto diet, which puts your body in a state of ketosis. That's what happens when your body's carb-burning switch flips to a fat-burning one, a change that can cause weight loss and has even been credited with controlling diabetes. (1)

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