In my book "Fat for Fuel," I sought to educate readers about the benefits of using healthy fats as a catalyst to bring about improved mitochondrial function, thus allowing you to achieve better health. In essence, the book answers WHY it is important for you to consume healthy fats. However, you still need to know HOW to prepare the right ketogenic foods in an appetizing way.
Increasing numbers of people around the world are suffering from chronic diseases such as diabetes and obesity, and the main culprit is usually the food they eat. The standard American diet, for example, consists of excessive amounts of protein, processed grains and carbohydrates ” particularly in the form of refined, added sugars ” none of which is good for your health.
Yancy WS Jr, Westman EC, McDuffie JR, Grambow SC, Jeffreys AS, Bolton J, Chalecki A, Oddone EZ, œA randomized trial of a low-carbohydrate diet vs orlistat plus a lowfat diet for weight loss, Arch Intern Med. 2010 Jan 25;170(2):136-45. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20101008?itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum&ordinalpos=2.
Not necessarily. It ultimately depends on you. SOme people may thrive by regularly counting calories, while others see counting calories as something œboring. The key here, if you do not want to count calories, is to structure your plate in order to guarantee you are consuming enough fat. Just make sure that in every meal you are eating no more than a palm-full of protein, try to increase the amount of fat in your diet, and try to decrease the amount of carbohydrates.
It's not for me, but it interesting to learn these things, and of course there seem to be good reasons for doing it for some people. I'm happy with the œeat less, exercise more diet for now, but I might try out intermittent fasting since I've seen a few things suggesting it might help with allergies? I doubt that's well supported, but I've liked what you've had to say about it, so since it's not a thing I have to spend money on to try out, might as well, right?
In my book "Fat for Fuel," I sought to educate readers about the benefits of using healthy fats as a catalyst to bring about improved mitochondrial function, thus allowing you to achieve better health. In essence, the book answers WHY it is important for you to consume healthy fats. However, you still need to know HOW to prepare the right ketogenic foods in an appetizing way.
You're transitioning. Your body is equipped to process a high intake of carbs and a lower intake of fat. Your body needs to create enzymes to be able to do this. In the transitional period, the brain may run low on energy which can lead to grogginess, nausea, and headaches. If you're having a large problem with this, you can choose to reduce carb intake gradually.
Also make sure that you know what foods have mostly carbs, fat, and protein, so you can make the right choices. For instance, it's not just bread, pasta, chips, cookies, candy, and ice cream that contain carbs. Beans may contain protein, but they're also very high in carbohydrates. Fruit and veggies also mostly contain carbs. The only foods that don't contain carbs are meat (protein) and pure fats, like butter and oils (including olive oil and coconut oil).

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