Achieving ketosis is a pretty straightforward, but it can seem complicated and confusing with all of the information out there.4If you want to learn more about ketosis and the scientific process around it, you can visit a very in-depth discussion about on Dr. Peter Attia's website. Here's the bottom line on what you need to do, ordered in levels of importance:
After about a three weeks of writing my low carb and keto posts, I think it's time to share a Keto Diet Plan for those of you interested in learning more about this diet.I don't just want to share diet basics; you need to leave here with a real understanding of how keto works. That's my job, to make this so simple anyone can do it. AlthoughI don't want you to just know how to make keto work, I want you to understand keto inside and out!
Check the nutrition labels on all your products to see if they're high in carbs. There are hidden carbs in the unlikeliest of places (like ketchup and canned soups). Try to avoid buying products with dozens of incomprehensible ingredients. Less is usually healthier.Always check the serving sizes against the carb counts. Manufacturers can sometimes recommend inconceivably small serving sizes to seemingly reduce calorie and carb numbers.

The biggest draw for me is how many of those who've tried it say they don't get hungry. The possibility of that blows my mind, as someone who's used to any sort of calorie restriction meaning hours of feeling hungry every day. It's tantalizing enough that I at least want to try. And what have I got to lose, right? I'm already morbidly obese; it's hard to imagine screwing this up so bad it makes that worse.
At the core of the classic ketogenic diet is severely restricting intake of all or most foods with sugar and starch (carbohydrates). These foods are broken down into sugar (insulin and glucose) in our blood once we eat them, and if these levels become too high, extra calories are much more easily stored as body fat and results in unwanted weight gain. However, when glucose levels are cut off due to low-carb dieting, the body starts to burn fat instead and produces ketones that can be measured in the blood (using urine strips, for example).
If this diet is so tough, then why has it been around since the 1920s? For starters, there's some evidence to suggest that ketogenic diets help regulate epilepsy, according to research in ISRN Pediatrics.Redox Biology reports the diet may benefit cancer patients. While it may be helpful for short-term weight loss, that wasn't the diet's original intention, and the jury's still out on its long-term effects.
Also make sure that you know what foods have mostly carbs, fat, and protein, so you can make the right choices. For instance, it's not just bread, pasta, chips, cookies, candy, and ice cream that contain carbs. Beans may contain protein, but they're also very high in carbohydrates. Fruit and veggies also mostly contain carbs. The only foods that don't contain carbs are meat (protein) and pure fats, like butter and oils (including olive oil and coconut oil).

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Medical Disclaimer: The material on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. Always consult your physician before beginning any diet or exercise program.

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